cluj Archives | Youth Cancer Europe (YCE)

Huge congratulations to our winners! We look forward to welcoming our survivors Magdalena (Poland), Jarly (UK), Bojan (Macedonia), Andrea (Spain) and Radu (Romania) and their guests to Cluj-Napoca this August for UNTOLD Festival! Thanks again to the promoters, and if you weren’t lucky this time keep an eye out for future opportunities. More to come soon!

We’ve teamed up with the amazing Untold Festival in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, to once again invite a number of lucky survivors to this year’s festival, taking place 2nd-5th August. 2018’s spectacular line-up includes The Prodigy, Bonobo, Armin Van Buuren, Dimitri Vegas & Like Mike, Afrojack and many more!

We have 5 double passes to give away, scroll down for the terms and conditions and to enter the competition!

Terms and Conditions for YCE Untold Festival Competition

  1. The competition is open to former cancer patients associated with Youth Cancer Europe and any of its network members who are aged 18 years or over, except employees of Youth Cancer Europe and their affiliated companies, their families or agencies or anyone professionally connected with the promotion. The Promoter reserves the right to verify the eligibility of entrants.
  2. To enter, email contact@youthcancereurope.org using the subject line “Untold Festival Competition”, telling us why you would like to attend Untold Festival 2018.
  3. The Promoter reserves the right to decline any entries that are defamatory or in breach of any applicable legislation or regulations.
  4. Out of all email entries, 5 winners will be drawn and given a pair of tickets each to attend this year’s Untold Festival in Cluj-Napoca, Romania.
  5. Closing date for entries is 23:59 CET on 15th March 2018. Any entries received after the closing date will not be accepted.
  6. The winner will be notified by email after 23:59 CEST on 15th March 2018. Winners are required to provide their full names, passport/EU ID card details, date of birth, phone number and email addresses so that they can be contacted by Youth Cancer Europe regarding prize delivery/collection details, travel and accommodation arrangements and in the event of artist meet-and-greet to facilitate access.
  7. Youth Cancer Europe will be providing tickets to attend the festival. Where possible, Youth Cancer Europe will also provide travel and accommodation for the winners. If a winner is unable to attend, they must notify Youth Cancer Europe as soon as possible to allow their prize to be re-allocated.
  8. Judges decision is final and no correspondence will be entered into regarding the outcome of the Prize awarded.
  9. The prize is non-transferable and no cash alternative is available. The Promoter reserves the right to substitute the prize for one of equal or greater value.
  10. The Promoter reserves the right to terminate, amend or extend this promotion in the event of exceptional circumstances outside its control, which affect its ability to operate the promotion.
  11. The winners are required to send photos and short testimonials from their experience at Untold Festival and to allow these to be shared on Youth Cancer Europe’s social media channels and website.
  12. Where artist meet-and-greets are organised by Youth Cancer Europe, the winners agree to have their picture taken for use in press and for social media promotions by Youth Cancer Europe.
  13. Access to artists’ meet-and-greets are subject to availability and are not guaranteed by Youth Cancer Europe. Where winners are granted access, please note that the same cannot be guaranteed for their guests.
  14. In administrating this promotion the Promoter will not collect more of your personal information than absolutely necessary and will only use your personal information for the purposes of this promotion.
  15. The rules of this competition shall be governed by and construed in accordance with the laws of Romania and shall have exclusive jurisdiction in relation to any disputes arising therefrom.

Promoter:

Youth Cancer Europe Foundation
Cluj-Napoca, Romania

*Prize details:

5x pairs of tickets to attend Untold Festival 2018 (2nd – 5th August 2018) (one pair per winner to attend with a guest of their choice)

Access to artist meet-and-greets where possible and as facilitated by Untold and/or the artists directly

Travel and accommodation will only be supplied where possible and are not guaranteed

The young cancer survivors often suffer from depression and have a hard time finding their place in society. The first study made in Romania on the needs of the people in this category reflects this situation. Over 200 young people participated in Cluj-Napoca at the first national seminar on long-term effects of cancer.

The attention and fertility issues or the fear of relapse were some of the topics discussed at the meeting of cancer survivors and medical specialists.

Emanuel Schip, survivor: “It is good to know what’s going to happen next, so you can prepare yourself.

Theodore Urziceanu, survivor: “The experiences of those who went through something like this could prove to be very useful.

The young people who attended also helped by participating in a study whereby the specialists could better understand the profile and needs of someone who survived cancer.

Katie Rizvi, founder of the Little People Romania: “It is a study that has never been done before. The most important thing the young people are concerned about is their fertility and the possibility of having children after cancer treatment.

The results also show that 20 percent of those who defeated the disease still suffer from chronic pain and experience difficulties in learning, while nearly 60 percent experience emotional difficulties and some of them even depression. 19 percent of those aged over 18 do not work and do not study and 16 percent face discrimination in the workplace.

Rodica Cosnarovici, Head of Pediatric Oncology Department in the Cluj Oncology Institute: “I think the most common problems that they face are psychological and reintegration problems“.

The doctors suggested that the Ministry of Health could also come to their aid, by developing a national pediatric oncology program at a national level.

Gheorghe Popa, pediatric oncologist: “Financing oncology programs for adults does not fully meet the children’s needs, as child cancer patients have special needs.

 

Originally published on 12th Dec 2015 via http://www.digi24.ro/Stiri/Digi24/Lejer/Sanatate/Supravietuitorii+cancerului+isi+cauta+locul+in+societate

205 young people who have completed their cancer treatment will participate on December 12th at the First National Seminar on Long-Term Effects of Cancer Treatment in Young Cancer Survivors organized by the Little People Association Romania in Cluj-Napoca.

The event, a first of its kind in Romania, will take place from 09.00 – 11.00 at the Grand Hotel Napoca, Cluj-Napoca, in the Forum Hall, on December 12th. The seminar addresses young people who have gone through the cancer treatment experience in their childhood or adolescence. Specialists in pediatric oncology confirmed their presence at this event, where they will be answering questions from the young cancer survivors.

“Tumors may disappear, but according to a survey from the Little People Association with young cancer survivors aged 17-31 as respondents, almost 20% of them suffer from chronic pain, have trouble learning and concentrating, while nearly 60% complain of emotional and mental exhaustion, and some of them even depression. Young people don’t have adequate information available to them on how to access social benefits, 19% of them aged over 18 are not working and not studying, 16% report discrimination at work or school. While data from all over the EU clearly shows that this group is at a high risk of developing long-term effects of cancer treatment or secondary cancers, there is no standardized long-term tracking and caring system for young survivors. Many of them go for regular checkups at the pediatrician, but most of them are lost in the whole medical process for young patients. “said Katie Rizvi, founder of the Little People Romania.

The attendees are registered members of the Temerarii Club – the Romanian Community of Young Cancer Survivors® founded by the Little People Association Romania in 2006.

The young survivors will also be delighted to participate for the eighth consecutive year at the Temerarii Christmas Gala. The theme of this year’s edition is Ice Ball. They will celebrate their victory over cancer, in Cluj-Napoca, the city where this community, the largest of its kind in Europe, was founded.

The Ice Ball – Temerarii Christmas Gala – will take place on December 12th, 2015 in the Grand Hotel Napoca, Cluj-Napoca, starting at 19:30. Media representatives are invited to raise a glass of champagne in honor of the young cancer survivors’ victory, at the event’s reception.

What Temerarii means today is more than 400 young people aged 14-30 years from over 123 localities in Romania who, from the moment they won the fight against cancer, have become true heroes, writing and rewriting daily a success story, being a true inspiration for those who now wage the same battle.

The Temerarii community is the founder of Youth Cancer Europe network – a European communication and initiative platform for the young people diagnosed with cancer, developed in 2014, with partners from 15 European countries.

Originally published 11th Dec 2015 via http://galasocietatiicivile.ro/stiri/sanatate/premiera-in-romania-seminar-national-despre-efectele-pe-termen-lung-ale-tratamentului-oncologic-la-tinerii-supravietuitori-de-cancer-15748.html

About 150 young cancer survivors from 10 European countries, including Romania, wore, Sunday evening at the Untold Festival from Cluj-Napoca, yellow shirts with a message against this illness, making a statement that there is life and hope after cancer.

The 150 young people arrived on Sunday at around 19.00 at the Cluj Arena in Cluj-Napoca, wearing yellow shirts with the message “Fuck Cancer” printed on them, planning to attend the performances taking place on the last evening of the Untold Festival, especially the one from David Guetta, Mediafax reported.

Katie Rizvi, founder of the Little People Association, told the journalists that the young people came to Cluj-Napoca to attend [a gathering with members of the Youth Cancer Europe community] and the Annual Summer Meeting for Young Cancer Survivors from Romania.

“From the 2nd to the 6th of August, the Little People Association will bring together in Cluj-Napoca 150 young cancer survivors from Romania and nine other European countries, including Poland, Slovenia, Belgium, Hungary and the Republic of Moldova, for the Annual Summer Meeting for Young Cancer Survivors from Romania, where the Youth Cancer Europe Advocacy Masterclass will also be held. The message on the shirts may seem controversial, but we don’t mean to offend anyone by it. At the same time, we are talking about young people who, when looking back at their lives and all the suffering they went through and yet trying to see it all in a positive light, that they are fighters in a battle with this terrible and cruel illness, sometimes would end up saying: “Fuck cancer” and they should be allowed to express themselves this way. They lost a few years fighting cancer, they went through chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and now they can say that they’re doing well, that there is life and hope after cancer, and that this disease can be defeated, “said Rizvi.

She also stated that the Masterclass is a training session specifically dedicated to young survivors of this disease being an important step for them in becoming ambassadors of all cancer survivors and in conveying an alternate message, a positive one.

“The young people will learn how to spread their message so that it reaches the general public and how to have the courage to share their experiences” said Rizvi.

Daniel Tomai, aged 22, is one of the participants at this event. When he was only 8 years old, he was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

“I underwent one year of intensive therapy, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and the disease went into remission. Now I am cured. It’s a terrible disease, and the hospitalization period was pretty rough, but I had a lot of self- confidence. When those around you hear that you have cancer, they already call the priests for the last rites. But our message is one of survival, that you can get over cancer and that your life can go on,” said Tomai, who is currently a student in the fourth year at the University of Medicine in Timisoara.

Oana Rusu, representative of the of the Little People Association in Cluj-Napoca, said that young cancer survivors should have an important contribution in presenting different disease cases, learning to develop their representation and networking skills, as well as their lobbying practices.

The young people attending the meeting are over 18 and they are survivors of various forms of child cancer, such as leukemia, melanoma and cerebral cancer.

Youth Cancer Europe is a European network with partners from 15 European countries, founded by the Little People Association. Some of the network’s priorities are the provision of age-appropriate and accessible treatments in Europe, long-term care and political and legal representation of young cancer patients.

The Annual Summer Meeting for Young Cancer Survivors from Romania will also host the General Assembly of the Temerarii Club, which was founded by the Little People Association in 2006. This club is a community of Romanian teenagers who beat cancer, with almost 400 members. The Temerarii Club became the largest active group of mutual support among adolescents and young adults affected by cancer, as well as one of the most active communities of its kind in Europe.

The Annual Summer Meeting of Young Cancer Survivors from Romania will take place as part of the project Cluj-Napoca 2015 – European Youth Capital.

Photo source: Untold Festival

Orignally published 3rd August 2015 via http://www.wall-street.ro/articol/Social/187092/untold-cluj-mesaj-impotriva-cancerului-lansat-de-tineri-supravie-uitori-ai-bolii.html